100 Years Ago in Bienville Parish – Sheriff, Deputies Kept Busy with Moonshiners

During the first week of August, 1922, Sheriff J.E. Currie and his deputies were kept busy with moonshiners.  The Eighteenth Amendment, which illegalized the manufacture, transportation, and sale of alcohol, was in effect from 1920 until 1933.  Fighting moonshiners was a constant battle because moonshine stills were easy to conceal in rural Bienville parish.  Law enforcement officers knew that moonshine stills required water, a necessary ingredient for whiskey, and so they knew to look around creeks and springs. 

Sometimes moonshiners were clever.   Oftentimes a customer would pay a moonshiner for a jar of the hooch.  In exchange for the money, the moonshiner would instruct the customer as to which log to look under, which tree stump to look behind, or which hollow tree to look into to retrieve the liquor.    

Moonshiners, however, had to have luck on their side all of the time, while law enforcement officers only had to be lucky once to catch an offender.  In the first week of August, 1922, sheriff’s deputies took four stills and arrested five still operators.  Those arrested were Roy Wiggins and Frank Meyers of Alberta, M. Theus and Jim Fisher of Ward 4, and Andrew Underwood of Ward 6.

In the same week, Sheriff Currie and Deputy Henderson Jordan (who succeeded Sheriff Currie and who is forever associated with ending the crime spree of Bonnie and Clyde) arrested Johnnie Wilson of Gibsland on an illegal whiskey charge. 

Sheriff Currie and Deputy Jordan also located a whiskey still across the line in Claiborne parish and assisted deputies from that parish in the arrests of Eugene Sanders and Amos Moore, operators of the still.  Bienville parish deputies had been on the trail of Sanders and Moore for some time as the moonshiners regularly sold their illegal booze in this parish.

Despite the high penalties inflicted on producers of illegal alcohol, the moonshiners kept distilling.  Undeterred, deputies with the Bienville Parish Sheriff’s Office continued to thwart moonshiners until the repeal of national prohibition in 1933.


Drawdown for Mill Creek Reservoir Begins Tomorrow

By Brad Dison

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and the Mill Creek Lake Commission have scheduled a drawdown on Mill Creek Reservoir, commonly referred to as Saline Lake.  The Lake Commission plans to lower the lake beginning August 13, 2022.

This drawdown is for shoreline maintenance and erosion control.

The lake will be lowered 4 to 6 inches per day until it reaches the target goal of 8 feet below normal pool stage.  The lake will be held at this level until about January 15, 2023, at which time the water control gate will be closed and the lake allowed to refill.

Reminder:

  • There is no fee to launch a boat from the boat launch near the dam.
  • There is a $10 fee per car to enter the Point.
  • Camping at the Point in a camper is $30 per night.
  • Camping in a tent at the Point is $15 per night.
  • The Watergate is closed until repairs to the dock can be made.

Cryptoquote

Print this page to work the puzzle.  If you are unable to print this page you can download it by clicking “Download” below.

Instructions:
ZCIRPZCI is EINSTEIN
In Cryptoquotes, one letter stands for another. In the example above, Z is used for two E’s, I for the two N’s, etc. Single letters, double letters, apostrophes, the length and formation of the words are all hints. The code letters change with each puzzle.

TODAY’S CRYPTOQUOTE:

“Q XGBK NKGSTKC EBKS WXK RKGSD WXGW JXKT ETK’D LQTC QD LGCK IZ, WXQD CQLQTQDXKD HKGS.” ~ SEDG ZGSYD

Previous Cryptoquote solution: “Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right.” ~ Henry Ford


Today in History – August 12

1099 – First Crusade: Battle of Ascalon Crusaders under the command of Godfrey of Bouillon defeated Fatimid forces led by Al-Afdal Shahanshah. This is considered the last engagement of the First Crusade.

1492 – Christopher Columbus arrived in the Canary Islands on his first voyage to the New World.

1676 – Praying Indian John Alderman shot and killed Metacomet, the Wampanoag war chief, and ended King Philip’s War.

1851 – Isaac Singer was granted a patent for his sewing machine.

1865 – Joseph Lister, British surgeon and scientist, performed the first antiseptic surgery.

1877 – Thomas Edison invented the phonograph and made the first sound recording.

1898 – The Hawaiian flag was lowered from ʻIolani Palace in an elaborate annexation ceremony and replaced with the flag of the United States to signify the transfer of sovereignty from the Republic of Hawaii to the United States.

1914 – World War I: The United Kingdom declared war on Austria-Hungary; the countries of the British Empire followed suit.

1914 – World War I: The Battle of Halen a.k.a. Battle of the Silver Helmets a clash between large Belgian and German cavalry formations at Halen, Belgium.

1944 – Waffen-SS troops massacred 560 people in Sant’Anna di Stazzema.

1944 – Nazi German troops ended the week-long Wola massacre, during which time at least 40,000 people were killed indiscriminately or in mass executions.

1944 – Alençon was liberated by General Philippe Leclerc de Hauteclocque, the first city in France to be liberated from the Nazis by French forces.

1950 – Korean War: Bloody Gulch massacre: 75 American POWs were massacred by the North Korean Army.

1952 – The Night of the Murdered Poets: Thirteen prominent Jewish intellectuals were murdered in Moscow, Russia, Soviet Union.

1953 – First thermonuclear bomb test: The Soviet atomic bomb project continued with the detonation of “RDS-6s” (Joe 4) using a “layered” scheme.

1960 – Echo 1A, NASA’s first successful communications satellite, was launched.

1960 – The Silver Beetles recruited drummer Pete Best.

1964 – South Africa was banned from the Olympic Games due to the country’s racist policies.

1966 – John Lennon apologized at a news conference in Chicago, IL, for his remark that “the Beatles are more popular than Jesus.”

1977 – The first free flight of the Space Shuttle Enterprise.

1981 – The IBM Personal Computer was released.

1990 – Sue, the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton found to date, was discovered by Sue Hendrickson in South Dakota.

1991 – Metallica’s self-titled album was released. The album is referred to as The Black Album.

1992 – Canada, Mexico and the United States announced completion of negotiations for the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

1994 – Major League Baseball players went on strike and forced the cancellation of the 1994 World Series.


2022 “Oceans of Possibilities” Summer Reading Awards Program Acknowledges Top Readers

The 2022 “Oceans of Possibilities” Summer Reading Program was a great success!

The Awards ceremony took place at each branch in the Bienville Parish Library system. The attendance was 192 participants for all inhouse performances with 1,804 books checked out in the 3 to 8-year-old group, and a whopping 28,466 pages read in the 9 to 13 and 14 to 17-year-old groups. This is a phenomenal success considering the Summer Reading Program was going on at the same time as summer school, sport camps, summer vacations, and Vacation Bible School programs.

There was a tidal wave of fun and entertaining performers that began in June with the Kinders kicking off the summer registration, next was Mr. Ricky Davis who entertained the children with songs and stories. Mr. Davis also drew in an adult following that enjoyed his music and stories as well! All Bienville Parish Libraries skipped the week that issued in the newest Federal holiday, “Juneteenth” and picked up the following week with Karen Konnerth and the Calliope Puppets. Finishing out the month of June and first week in July, was Daisy the world-famous pig and Farmer Minor. They celebrated their retirement tour with stories and farewell smooches! Everyone celebrated Independence Day and on July 6th through July 8th we discovered the oceans with Shana Smith and Friends with a Banana Beach party!

A perennial favorite, Elizabeth Vidos also known as “Lady Chops” introduced participants with new percussion devices that mimic the sounds of the ocean waves and the rhythms of the ocean. Feedback from the children, parents, and grandparents was great and everyone had a wonderful time seeing school friends and visiting with their favorite librarians!

The Top Readers were honored with prizes, certificates of achievement and showers of confetti and streamers! The special treats were ocean blue frosted cupcakes, and snow cones in oceanic colors of crystal blue raspberry, indigo grape and red buoy cherry flavors!

All the children that finished the program received their brag tags, a reading certificate, and a small bag prize. Each library in the system selected their Top Readers of the 2022 Summer Reading Program!

Below is a list from each library of their top reader by age group! We congratulate children, their parents, grandparents and caregivers that attended our performances and brought their children in to take part in the 2022 “Oceans of Possibilities” Summer Reading Program at their neighborhood Bienville Parish Library!

2022 SRP Reading Champion

Evan Robinson
Bienville Parish Library System
Saline Branch

ARCADIA

Ages 3-8
Briston Passon

Ages 9-13
Braelyn Sherrill

RINGGOLD

Ages 3-8
Miles Moore

Ages 9-13
Breasia Carrol

Ages 14-17
Jaydan Cato

SALINE

Ages 3-8
Caleb Hammond

Ages 9-13
Evan Robinson

Family Readers
Ashton Anderson

Family/Independent Readers
Landry and Norah Burns

CASTOR

Ages 3-8
Raven Bolyer

Ages 9-13
Callie Raynes

GIBSLAND

Ages 3-8
Treasure Kenner

Ages 9-13
Anaiah Barr


LA Distributes $25 Million in Homeowner Assistance to Thousands Affected by Pandemic, Encourages More to Apply

The state of Louisiana has distributed $25.4 million in mortgage assistance to 2,769 homeowners through the Louisiana Homeowner Assistance Fund, a federally funded relief program for homeowners financially affected by COVID-19 who are behind on their mortgages and at risk of foreclosure. Louisiana was one of the first states in the country to launch the program.

“Disbursing $25 million in assistance to homeowners throughout the state is an important milestone for the program and for Louisiana, as so many residents continue to face financial impacts of COVID-19,” said Gov. John Bel Edwards. “Our goal is to serve as many eligible homeowners as possible, and this is only the beginning. We know that there are many more of our people who could take advantage of this program, and that’s why I am encouraging those homeowners impacted by COVID-19 and meet the eligibility criteria to learn more and apply.”

Homeowners can find out if they are eligible to receive assistance and apply by visiting haf.lacovidhousing.com.

The program—launched in January 2022 and funded through the American Rescue Plan Act—provides $10 billion in federal relief for vulnerable homeowners nationwide. Louisiana received $146.7 million and can provide up to $25,000 per eligible Louisiana homeowner. The Louisiana Office of Community Development is administering the program.

Eligible homeowners include those who meet the following criteria:

  • Own and occupy a home in Louisiana as their primary residence
  • Meet income qualifications
  • Must be at least 30 days delinquent on mortgage payments
  • Experienced a financial hardship associated with the COVID-19 pandemic

“The state has taken several steps to establish efficiencies in the review process so that funds will more quickly be delivered to approved homeowners, and we continue to work with partner lenders to streamline and simplify the process,” said Desireé Honoré Thomas, assistant commissioner of statewide services for the Division of Administration. “Our goal is to provide this assistance to residents in need as quickly as possible, and we’re doing everything we can to make that happen.”

Renters financially impacted during COVID-19 who are behind on rent payments may also be eligible for assistance through the Louisiana Emergency Rental Assistance Program. ERAP—launched in March 2021 and funded through the Consolidated Appropriations Act and the American Rescue Plan Act—provides emergency rental and utility assistance to Louisiana residents in 57 parishes who experienced housing instability during the COVID-19 pandemic.

To apply or learn more about HAF and ERAP, visit lacovidhousing.com. Program hotlines are open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at:

  • LA HAF Call Center 833.88.LAHAF (833.885.2423)
  • ERAP Call Center 877.456.6555

Angler’s Perspective: Critiquing High School Fishing

Before I give my unsolicited opinion, understand one thing; I love that high school bass fishing is really taking off. I think it’s great for the sport and these kids are the future of bass fishing! These young anglers today are quick learners, especially when it comes to the electronics side of fishing. These mini computers on bass boats today are information superhighways and short cuts on how to catch bass. Operating these units is second nature for the up-and-coming generation of young anglers.

But I’m tired of watching You Tube videos where the dad, uncle or professional fishing guide tells them where they need to fish and what bait they should tie on. The sport has become who can hire the best pro or guide for their kid’s team. This is not good for the sport down the road and it’s simply not a level playing field!

Here’s what I question about high school tournaments on tournament day: Are kids being taught the right way? Are they being taught the ethics of fishing bass tournaments? Are they being taught how to find fish rather than a boat captain telling them where they need to make their next cast? Are they netting their own fish or is the boat captain? Are they making the decisions on tournament day or is the boat captain making them?

First, let’s look at this from my viewpoint as a self-taught angler that has fished tournament trails since the early 1990’s. This viewpoint is not only mine, but many other tournament anglers all across bass fishing. One thing that’s really starting to get under my skin is how parents or grandparents are employing pro anglers or fishing guides as their kids’ boat captain. So, if you’re the parent of a kid who wants to fish high school tournaments, please stop doing this! I understand boat captains can be hard to find and I appreciate anyone who volunteers to be a boat captain and take kids fishing.

I look at boat captains the same way I look at Dixie Youth or Little League coaches. Some have no clue on how to teach or play the game of baseball, but they are willing to volunteer their time for the sake of the kids. I applaud all volunteers who do this! But the purpose of the boat captain should be to drive the boat and make sure the kids are safe on the water, not to take kids out and show them exactly where the fish are! Baseball coaches can’t hit or pitch for their baseball teams, then why should a boat captain make decisions or net their kid’s fish.

The toughest thing to learn as a bass angler is how to find fish. So, when a pro guide or a seasoned tournament angler shows them exactly where to cast and how to catch the fish, then the kids haven’t learned anything. I’m not against the boat captain explaining why the fish are there after the kids have found them, but the teaching part should be done during the practice session…not on tournament day!

Next, the boat captains should not be allowed to net the fish the high school kids are catching. This too is part of the learning curve all young anglers need to learn to master along with bait tying, bait selection, map reading and how to cull their catch. These are TEAM tournaments and I emphasize the word TEAM! Let the kids do their own netting and learn to work together. Let them learn how to read the water and know what baits they should be using based on their observations. The reward for them personally will be so much greater than having a pro/guide or boat captain doing these things for them!

While I sound a little harsh, that’s my intent! I want kids to learn on their own. This is how the two “C’s” are built….confidence and character. I want kids to be able to stand alone as an angler years from now, whether they are a touring pro or just fishing open tournaments. When you learn on your own as an angler, it makes you a better fisherman. Do I want to see these kids have success? Absolutely!!!! But I want to see them learn for themselves and make their own decisions as a TEAM with no outside influence from a boat captain. Till next time, good luck, good fishing and don’t forget your sunscreen!

Steve Graf – Owner Co-Host
Hook’N Up & Track’N Down Show & Tackle Talk Live


Parish Library Seeks Veterans, Veterans Families to Record Experiences

The Bienville Parish Library system is about to embark on the Veterans History Project. If you are a Veteran or a family member of a Veteran, please consider sharing your story of your experiences in the U.S. military.

Your story will become an important part of our American Legacy and all video recorded interviews will be sent to be archived with the Library of Congress to become part of their permanent archives and a copy will become part of the Bienville Parish Library Genealogical Collection. We have all the information about the Veterans History Project, and will be ready to schedule your interview beginning September 15th. See less


Notice of Death – August 11, 2022

  • Bettye Dawn Spainhour
    February 9, 1933 – August 7, 2022
    Funeral services will be held Saturday, August 13, 2022 at 10:30 A.M. in Rockett Funeral Home Chapel, Ringgold, LA.  Burial will follow in Providence Cemetery, Ringgold, LA. Visitation will be from 6:00 – 8:00 P.M., Friday, August 12, 2022 in Rockett Funeral Home, Ringgold, LA.
  • Walter Jenkins
    July 3, 1961 – August 5, 2022
    Visitation will be Saturday, August 13, 2022 from 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. at Paradise Funeral Home in Arcadia.  The service will be Sunday, August 14, 2022 at 2:30 p.m. at New Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church in Arcadia.  Burial will follow at Mt. Calvary Cemetery in Arcadia.

Disqualified Candidate for Mayor of Arcadia Loses Appeal

LaShondra Elaine Russell’s has lost her appeal to be reinstated as a candidate for the position of Mayor of Arcadia.  Qualifying for the November 8th election ended July 22nd.  Three candidates, O’Landis “Bubba” Millican, LaShondra Elaine Russell, and Bonnie Stephenson qualified for the Mayor of the town of Arcadia race. 

On July 26, Angela Millican filed an “Objection to Candidacy” petition against LaShondra Elaine Russell.  In the petition, Ms. Millican stated that “pursuant to LA R.S. 18:463, all candidates for public office and in this case, the Office of Mayor for the Town of Arcadia, must have been domiciled and actually resided for at least the immediate preceding year in the municipality for which the office is sought.”  Ms. Millican sought to have Ms. Russell disqualified as a candidate for the Mayor’s position because Ms. Russell “did not meet the qualification for having domiciled and actually resided in the city limits for the preceding year prior to qualifying.”  

After considering the petition, evidence, and testimonies of Ms. Millican and Ms. Russell at a hearing held on Monday, August 1st, Judge Glenn Fallin ordered that Ms. Russell be disqualified as candidate for the office of Mayor of the town of Arcadia.

On Tuesday, August 2nd, Ms. Russell filed an appeal in the case with the Second Circuit of Appeals.  Yesterday, August 9, the Second Circuit of Appeals discerned “no manifest error in the trial court’s disqualification of Russell,” and affirmed the trial judge’s decision.  Ms. Russell lost her appeal and will not appear on the November 8 ballot as a candidate for Mayor of Arcadia.

See the complete judgement by the Second Circuit Court of Appeals below.


Troopers Urge Motorists to Exercise Caution as Schools Resume Across the State

As the 2022-23 school year is beginning, Louisiana State Police would like to remind motorists to drive with extra care and be especially aware of school zone speed limits, school buses loading or unloading children, and children walking or biking to school. Troopers along with local law enforcement will be patrolling school zones throughout the state, and speeding will not be tolerated while school zone speed limits are in effect. Most school zones have a reduced speed limit from 7:00-9:00 am and 2:00-4:00 pm. However, some zones are marked with slightly different times, and it is the responsibility of motorists to be aware of these speed zones and to reduce their speed accordingly.

A school bus is designed to be the safest vehicle on the road, but the greatest risk to our school-age children is the loading and unloading of children at bus stops. As a reminder to motorists, all vehicular traffic must stop no less than 30 feet from a school bus when the stop signals on the bus are activated. A vehicle approaching a stopped school bus from the opposite direction does not have to stop when traffic is separated by a divided median, but must remain cautious of the children boarding or exiting the bus.

Additionally, motorists are encouraged to remember that:

  • Louisiana Law states that no person shall operate any wireless communication device, which includes texting and any social media, while operating a motor vehicle during the posted hours within a school zone. School zones across Louisiana are hands-free zones, so put that cell phone down while driving
  • School crossing guards have the authority to direct vehicles through intersections when traffic lights are red and to stop vehicles when the traffic lights are green. Motorists who are approaching school zones are urged to pay attention to the school crossing guards for hand instructions.

Motorists should expect traffic congestion and possible delays near school zones. It is important for each driver to be patient with the increased traffic and allow extra time to arrive safely at their destination. Remember to always buckle up and insist that ALL occupants in the vehicle are buckled up as well. Keeping these safety tips in mind will help assure a safe school year not only for our children, but for the motoring public as well.

When to stop for school buses:

  • Two Lanes: Vehicles traveling in each direction are required to stop when the bus’s red lights are flashing.
  • Three Lanes: When the highway has a center turning land with one travel lane on each side, vehicles traveling in each direction are required to stop when the bus’s red lights are flashing.
  • Four Lanes:  Vehicles traveling in each direction are required to stop when the bus’s red lights are flashing.
  • Divided Highway:  When the highway has a grass median or other physical barriers, only traffic moving int he same direction as the bus is required to stop when the bus’s red lights are flashing.  Oncoming traffic should proceed with caution.
  • Divided Highway:  When the highway has a center turning lane with two travel lanes on each side, only traffic moving in the same direction as the bus is required to stop when the bus’s red lights are flashing.  Oncoming traffic should proceed with caution.

Vote for America’s Best Looking Cruiser, Winners to Be Included in Calendar

The 9th Annual AAST “Americas Best Looking Cruisier” calendar contest is underway! Voting began at 12:00PM EST yesterday and will run through 5:00PM EST August 25, 2022.

The top 13 states receiving votes will be featured on the respective months on the 2023 AAST Calendar. The top state will adorn the cover in addition to the month of January 2023.

Click Here to vote for Our State.


2022 “Oceans of Possibilities” Summer Reading Awards Program Acknowledges Top Readers

The 2022 “Oceans of Possibilities” Summer Reading Program was a great success!

The Awards ceremony took place at each branch in the Bienville Parish Library system. The attendance was 192 participants for all inhouse performances with 1,804 books checked out in the 3 to 8-year-old group, and a whopping 28,466 pages read in the 9 to 13 and 14 to 17-year-old groups. This is a phenomenal success considering the Summer Reading Program was going on at the same time as summer school, sport camps, summer vacations, and Vacation Bible School programs.

There was a tidal wave of fun and entertaining performers that began in June with the Kinders kicking off the summer registration, next was Mr. Ricky Davis who entertained the children with songs and stories. Mr. Davis also drew in an adult following that enjoyed his music and stories as well! All Bienville Parish Libraries skipped the week that issued in the newest Federal holiday, “Juneteenth” and picked up the following week with Karen Konnerth and the Calliope Puppets. Finishing out the month of June and first week in July, was Daisy the world-famous pig and Farmer Minor. They celebrated their retirement tour with stories and farewell smooches! Everyone celebrated Independence Day and on July 6th through July 8th we discovered the oceans with Shana Smith and Friends with a Banana Beach party!

A perennial favorite, Elizabeth Vidos also known as “Lady Chops” introduced participants with new percussion devices that mimic the sounds of the ocean waves and the rhythms of the ocean. Feedback from the children, parents, and grandparents was great and everyone had a wonderful time seeing school friends and visiting with their favorite librarians!

The Top Readers were honored with prizes, certificates of achievement and showers of confetti and streamers! The special treats were ocean blue frosted cupcakes, and snow cones in oceanic colors of crystal blue raspberry, indigo grape and red buoy cherry flavors!

All the children that finished the program received their brag tags, a reading certificate, and a small bag prize. Each library in the system selected their Top Readers of the 2022 Summer Reading Program!

Below is a list from each library of their top reader by age group! We congratulate children, their parents, grandparents and caregivers that attended our performances and brought their children in to take part in the 2022 “Oceans of Possibilities” Summer Reading Program at their neighborhood Bienville Parish Library!

2022 SRP Reading Champion

Evan Robinson
Bienville Parish Library System
Saline Branch

ARCADIA

Ages 3-8
Briston Passon

Ages 9-13
Braelyn Sherrill

RINGGOLD

Ages 3-8
Miles Moore

Ages 9-13
Breasia Carrol

Ages 14-17
Jaydan Cato

SALINE

Ages 3-8
Caleb Hammond

Ages 9-13
Evan Robinson

Family Readers
Ashton Anderson

Family/Independent Readers
Landry and Norah Burns

CASTOR

Ages 3-8
Raven Bolyer

Ages 9-13
Callie Raynes

GIBSLAND

Ages 3-8
Treasure Kenner

Ages 9-13
Anaiah Barr


Today in History – August 10

1519 – Ferdinand Magellan’s five ships set sail from Seville to circumnavigate the globe. The Basque second-in-command Juan Sebastián Elcano completed the expedition after Magellan’s death in the Philippines.

1628 – The Swedish warship Vasa sank in the Stockholm harbor after only about 20 minutes of her maiden voyage.

1675 – The foundation stone of the Royal Greenwich Observatory in London, England was laid.

1680 – The Pueblo Revolt began in New Mexico.

1755 – Under the direction of Charles Lawrence, the British began to forcibly deport the Acadians from Nova Scotia to the Thirteen Colonies and France.

1776 – American Revolutionary War: Word of the United States Declaration of Independence reached London.

1793 – The Musée du Louvre officially opened in Paris, France.

1821 – Missouri was admitted as the 24th U.S. state.

1846 – The Smithsonian Institution was chartered by the United States Congress after James Smithson donated $500,000.

1856 – The Last Island hurricane struck Louisiana, which resulted in over 200 deaths.

1861 – American Civil War: Battle of Wilson’s Creek: A mixed force of Confederate, Missouri State Guard, and Arkansas State troops defeated outnumbered attacking Union forces in the southwestern part of the state.

1901 – The U.S. Steel recognition strike by the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers began.

1932 – A 5.1 kilograms (11 lb) chondrite-type meteorite broke into at least seven pieces and landed near the town of Archie in Cass County, Missouri.

1944 – World War II: The Battle of Guam came to an effective end.

1944 – World War II: The Battle of Narva ended with a defensive German victory.

1948 – Candid Camera made its television debut after being on radio for a year as Candid Microphone.

1949 – An amendment to the National Security Act of 1947 enhanced the authority of the United States Secretary of Defense over the Army, Navy and Air Force, and replaced the National Military Establishment with the Department of Defense.

1954 – At Massena, New York, the groundbreaking ceremony for the Saint Lawrence Seaway was held.

1954 – Elvis Presley made an appearance in Memphis where he debuted “That’s All Right (Mama).”

1959 – The four male members of the Platters are arrested and charged with aiding and abetting prostitution, lewdness and assignation. They were acquitted on December 10, 1959.

1961 – Vietnam War: The U.S. Army began Operation Ranch Hand, spraying an estimated 20 million US gallons of defoliants and herbicides over rural areas of South Vietnam in an attempt to deprive the Viet Cong of food and vegetation cover.

1969 – A day after murdering Sharon Tate and four others, members of Charles Manson’s cult killed Leno and Rosemary LaBianca.

1970 – Jim Morrison’s trial for allegedly exposing himself onstage in Miami, FL, began.

1971 – The Society for American Baseball Research was founded in Cooperstown, New York.

1972 – Paul and Linda McCartney were arrested for drug possession after a concert in Gothenburg Sweden. Paul was fined $1,000 and Linda $200.

1977 – In Yonkers, New York, 24-year-old postal employee David Berkowitz (“Son of Sam”) was arrested for a series of killings in the New York City area over the period of one year.

1978 – Three members of the Ulrich family were killed in an accident. This led to the Ford Pinto litigation.

1981 – Murder of Adam Walsh: The head of John Walsh’s son was found. This inspired the creation of the television series America’s Most Wanted and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

1985 – Madonna’s Like A Virgin became the first album by a female to be certified for 5 million sales.

1988 – Japanese American internment: U.S. President Ronald Reagan signed the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, providing $20,000 payments to Japanese Americans who were either interned in or relocated by the United States during World War II.

1990 – The Magellan space probe reached Venus.

1995 – Oklahoma City bombing: Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols were indicted for the bombing. Michael Fortier pled guilty in a plea-bargain for his testimony.

1995 – Jimmy Buffett led a birthday celebration for U.S. President Clinton’s birthday at the White House.

2001 – Space Shuttle program: The Space Shuttle Discovery was launched on STS-105 to the International Space Station, carrying the astronauts of Expedition 3 to replace the crew of Expedition 2.

2004 – The iTunes Music Store became the first store to have a catalog of more than one million songs.

2018 – Horizon Air employee Richard Russell hijacked and performed an unauthorized takeoff on a Horizon Air Bombardier Dash 8 Q400 plane at Seattle–Tacoma International Airport in Washington, flying it for more than an hour before crashing the plane and killing himself on Ketron Island in Puget Sound.

2020 – Derecho in Iowa became the most costly thunderstorm disaster in U.S. history.


Remember This?: Bess’s Parts

Bess was the queen of Hollywood. She was born in Sherman, Texas in 1898. After high school, she attended the Oklahoma College for Women in Chickasha where she often performed on stage. In 1916, she played dual parts or characters in Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” and another in the “Merchant of Venice.” As this production was staged by a women’s college, all of the parts, male and female, were performed by females. All of the characters Bess portrayed were men, which is a testament to her talent.

Within a few years, Bess made her way to Hollywood where she appeared in her first film, a 1923 silent comedy film entitled “Hollywood.” Her talents were such that she made two more feature films in her first year in the business. Within three years, Bess became the go-to-girl in Hollywood. In addition to her other acting abilities, Bess began to get acting jobs because of her beautiful hands. She had what the First National Productions studios claimed were the most photographed hands in the world. One reporter boasted, “Her hands are her fortune, sir!” When a movie studio needed a closeup of a beautiful feminine hand, Bess was the actress they would call first. Many leading actresses of the time, according to one reporter, “ofttimes subject themselves to exposure and their hands in many cases suffer from the elements. Consequently, when a close-up of the hands is to be made, they are in many cases unable to offer their own hands due to the fact that they have not been properly cared for and ‘groomed,’ as it were, for the particular occasion.”

Bess, on the other hand, (pun intended) kept her hands properly groomed. She kept to a strict set of rules for the care of her hands. When out in public, Bess always wore thin silk gloves to protect her hands. Every night, she rubbed her hands thoroughly with the skin of a lemon followed by a special cream concocted by a film studio master make-up artist just for her. She allowed her fingernails to grow abnormally long so they could be easily manicured to fit within the film’s script.

As many actor’s and actress’s careers floundered with the transition of the movie industry from silent pictures to “talkie” pictures, Bess remained busy. In 1935, parts of Bess appeared in “Star of Midnight,” which starred William Powell and Ginger Rogers. Bess’s character is pivotal in the film because the plot hinges on her character’s disappearance. In the film, the audience glimpses her ankles as she enters a taxicab, she waves from the taxi’s window, and speaks a few lines, but no more is seen of her. Her presence in other films varied between a quick view of her waving hand to her speaking a few lines. If you watch a film from the 1920s through the 1960s, you will most likely see all or part of Bess, though you may not realize it.

Although Bess had a lucrative Hollywood career for more than four decades, she thought she was no good at acting. However, Bess became the most prolific actress in the history of motion pictures. She appeared in over 700 films, more than any other actor or actress. She appeared in five films which won Academy Awards for Best Picture, more than any other actor or actress. Those films include “It Happened One Night” (1934), “You Can’t Take It with You” (1938), “All About Eve” (1950), “The Greatest Show on Earth” (1952), and “Around the World in 80 Days” (1956). She also appeared in twenty other films which were nominated for Best Picture, more than any other actor or actress. It is doubtful that you will have ever heard the name Bess Flowers, but due to Bess’s parts, she became and remains the “Queen of the Hollywood Extras.”

Sources:

1. The Chickasha Daily Express (Chickasha, Oklahoma), April 20, 1916, p.1.
2. The Minneapolis Star, March 6, 1926, p.23.
3. Palladium-Item (Richmond, Indiana), July 23, 1927, p.13.
4. The Record (Hackensack, New Jersey), March 12, 1935, p.23.


Arrest Report

July 31

  • Guevara Johnson, Jr. – Prairieville
    • Operating Vehicle with Suspended License: No License Issued
  • Tre Shawn Brown Davis – Fort, TX
    • Maximum Speed Limit
    • Driver Must Be Licensed

August 1

  • Phillip Page – Bienville
    • Second Degree Kidnapping – Felony
    • Aggravated Assault – Misdemeanor
    • Possession or Distribution of Drug Paraphernalia – Misdemeanor
    • Aggravated Flight from an Officer – Felony
    • @nd Degree Battery – Felony
    • Possession of Firearm/Carry Concealed Weapon by Convicted Felon – Felony
  • Gina Guin – Castor
    • Domestic Abuse Battery with Child Endangerment – Felony

August 2

  • Reginald Rhodes – Arcadia
    • Tail Lamps Required
    • Flight from an Officer – Misdemeanor
    • Possession of Marijuana 14 Grams or Less – Misdemeanor
    • Possession of Crack Cocaine Less Than 28 Grams – Felony
  • Michael Cottingham – Ringgold
    • Contributing to the Delinquency of Juveniles – Felony
    • Aggravated Burglary – Felony
  • Shandreka Richardson – Arcadia
    • Possession or Distribution of Drug Paraphernalia – Misdemeanor
    • Possession of Marijuana 14 Grams or Less – Misdemeanor
    • Possession of Crack Cocaine Less Than 28 Grams – Felony

August 4

  • Daniel Patterson – Arcadia
    • Aggravated Battery with Dangerous Weapon – Felony
  • Toby Buchan – Bienville
    • Prohibited Acts – Obtain or Attempt to Obtain a Prescription Blank
    • Criminal Mischief – Filing a False Police Report
  • Terry Brown – Jonesboro
    • Operating Vehicle with Suspended License; No License Issued

August 5

  • James Patterson – Arcadia
    • Simple Battery

August 6

  • Charles Robertson, Jr. – Arcadia
    • Domestic Abuse Battery with Child Endangerment – Felony
    • Domestic Abuse Battery Involving Strangulation – Felony

Teddy Allen: Don’t Ask For Whom the School Bell Tolls…

We couldn’t afford a bicycle then, so I learned early how to stick my thumb out in the wind and hitch a ride in a pickup or on a tractor the two miles into our rural Carolina town for my first-grade classes.

My parents believed in tough love.

They were Old School, even though I was the very definition of New School.

Since they had to walk to school uphill 16 miles and back home, again uphill, for 17, they figured I was getting off easy by having to flag down a ride for just two measly miles. “And FLAT miles at that!” I can hear them say, maybe tough lovingly.

Of course, modern kids have gotten soft now and don’t hitchhike to school as they once did. Don’t get me started. . .

Here’s something else that’s changed, and not for the better.

No matter how “bored” or out of sorts you might have gotten with school back then — and even those of us who actually secretly sort of liked school and realized it was “good for us” wanted to run away now and then – we knew the Start Game and the End Game. And that helped.

The Great State of South Carolina and all us little children there cut a deal with each other: the state owned us from right after Labor Day until Memorial Day. No questions asked. You’d get a day at Thanksgiving and Easter and a few days at Christmastime, the Super Bowl Week of being a kid, but the rest of the time, your denim-covered butt was in a desk at Lake View Elementary.

BUT … they could not touch us from Memorial Day until Labor Day. No one even SAID “school” during June, July and August. We were a hands-off, school-free zone.

Summer, with all its bee stings and scraped knees and bologna sandwiches, was ours.

We could play AND we could make all the money, picking cucumbers or driving a tractor or, depending on how low you were to the ground, picking up tobacco sticks at the barn if your leg wasn’t long enough to reach the clutch on a Farmall yet.

Just thinking about it makes me want to kick off my shoes and go run in the grass and step on a nail and have to go get a tetanus shot. (Even summer had its risks. But the risks were worth it.)

Somewhere along the way, it was decided by Grownups that school would start Early, and so children are back at school this week even though it’s just now double-digits in August. (We’re talking dates, not temperature.) There will be “breaks” and the number of days spent in class will be the same now as they were back when I went to school, back when only four vowels and 22 consonants had been invented.

And maybe it’s better that way, but you ask people from our generation, and we’ll tell you being out for three months solid was the way to go, that even the thought of hitching a ride to school in August was a two-thumbs-down deal.

Contact Teddy at teddy@latech.edu 


Disqualified Candidate for Mayor of Arcadia Files Appeal

Disqualified Arcadia mayoral candidate LaShondra Elaine Russell is determined to be on the ballot in the November 8 election.  On Monday, after considering all the evidence presented in a hearing, Judge Glenn Fallin ordered that Ms. Russell be disqualified as a candidate for the office of Mayor of the town of Arcadia.  On Tuesday, Ms. Russell filed an appeal in the case.  Watch for updates on the appeal case in the Bienville Parish Journal. 

Original Story from August 3, 2022:

Qualifying for the November 8th election ended July 22nd.  Three candidates, O’Landis “Bubba” Millican, LaShondra Elaine Russell, and Bonnie Stephenson qualified for the Mayor of the town of Arcadia race. 

On July 26, Angela Millican filed an “Objection to Candidacy” petition against LaShondra Elaine Russell. 

In the petition, Ms. Millican stated that “pursuant to LA R.S. 18:463, all candidates for public office and in this case, the Office of Mayor for the Town of Arcadia, must have been domiciled and actually resided for at least the immediate preceding year in the municipality for which the office is sought.”   

Ms. Millican sought to have Ms. Russell disqualified as a candidate for the Mayor’s position because Ms. Russell “did not meet the qualification for having domiciled and actually resided in the city limits for the preceding year prior to qualifying.”  

After considering the petition, evidence, and testimonies of Ms. Millican and Ms. Russell at a hearing held on Monday, August 1st, Judge Glenn Fallin ordered that Ms. Russell be disqualified as candidate for the office of Mayor of the town of Arcadia.